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Showing posts from March, 2008

comment on why s/w engg can't buy a benz in India..

Nice blog.And good analysis of what does prevent an Indian S/w engg from driving a benz.But I am fully in support of the two comments by devranjan & neo. India really needs inclusive growth. i don't remember the exact figures but the contribution to the GDP from Services sector is 6o%+ and that from the manufacturing & textile which needs the most of the human resource is 20%+ and farming has poor contribution less than 10%. And we all know that 60%+ population is directly agri dependent and other remaining are industry dependent and only 13% human resource is there in services industry which brings this 60%+ of the GDP. Thats dangerous for any economy(this is my personal openion ,I am not any economist).But as I understand if only two ppl in a family of 10 are bread earners and if they unfortunately die the family has no option other than being a begger.So we should try our level best to have every one included in the development. I am aware of the situation that the econ…

Google hires

Google hires top talent in India to focus on Google News

Rahul Roy-Chowdhury spent nearly two decades in the U.S. before joining Google as its product manager for Google News. His particular mandate is to broaden Google News’ reach in India, and his company’s sent him back to capitalize on India’s strangely voracious appetite for news.

It’s one of the few countries in which newspaper circulation is actually increasing. That’s partly because rising incomes and education levels have stoked literacy, Roy-Chowdhury says, but it also has to do with the slow spread of Internet access. Of course, Google is planning for the day when every Indian can surf the Web for news, and it’s clear that when they can, they’ll still want what they like now: local news.

“If you leaf through almost any newspaper here, the sequence of sections is telling,” he says. “Generally, city and state news is given pride of place, followed by some national news and generally a small amount of international coverage.”

Roy-…

Wisdom from the way-out-edge - James Gosling

As the principal creator of the Java programming language, James Gosling is one of the few original hard-core IT geeks left.
At 14, he broke into the computer science department at the University of Calgary in Canada and taught himself to write software; he later received a computer science degree there.
The title of his PhD thesis from Carnegie Mellon University was The Algebraic Manipulation of Constraints.
He has built satellite data acquisition systems, a multiprocessor version of Unix, several compilers, mail systems and window managers. As well, he has built a WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) text editor, a constraint-based drawing editor and a text editor called "Emacs" for Unix.
Seriously geek.
But, as they usually are, Mr Gosling is insightful, friendly, and highly amusing, wearing when we met the requisite technology T-shirt du jour, Galileo. He was in Australia recently for a couple of developer conferences.
At 52, Mr Gosling is a researcher at Sun Microsystems wh…

companies will look at India as their destination for offshore R&D

Though India is witnessing a slowdown in its offshore R&D activities, fewer companies will look at India as their destination for offshore R&D centers in the next 18 months.In 2005, there were 75 new offshore R&D centers in India. The number has dwindled to just 15 last year. There are about 600 MNC captives in the county where R&D offshoring activity was estimated at $6 billion and is seen as growing at 23 percent. In the total R&D market, software product development captures over 50 percent, with the balance contributed by embedded systems space. Some key reasons for this trend were cost escalation of 8 percent to 15 percent, attrition of up to 20 percent, difficulty in scalability and lack of recruitment bandwidth, says a study by Zinnov Consulting. However, the silver lining is that many of the large and established R&D centers will lend a lot of buoyancy to R&D activity from India.In fact, large companies will grow till their head count reaches 30 per…

India Has no more cost advantage

As cost of operation and managing offshore center in India has no more cost advantage. Innovation and optimization have become the buzzwords for success of India centers. The "Offshore R&D2008" which concluded in Bangalore on Friday discussed ways to imbibe a culture of innovation in the organization and strategies to achieve optimization.Naresh Chand Guptha, Senior Vice president, Print and Publishing Business Unit and MD, Adobe systems in his Key note speech shared his experience in Adobe and said that to retain best talent in the organization, it needs give up the ownership of the product to engineers who are working on it. And allow them to spend time with the development of product or IP. Intrapreneurship is the key tool to support, eulogize and reward the talents.
"Being innovative is not a nationalistic character. It's shocking that still there is a perception that cheap engineers provide cheap solutions. The perception of Indian engineers are not creative…
Debt waiver skewed to favour rich landholders: SainathTue, Mar 4 11:19 AMNew Delhi, March 4 (IANS) The one-time waiver of bank debts for 'small and marginal' farmers announced in the union budget will cover only a small fraction of needy farmers and is skewed in favour of rich landholders, says Magsaysay Award winner P. Sainath.The debt waiver itself was good but would impact on only a few distressed farmers, the renowned columnist and rural affairs editor of The Hindu newspaper said Monday while delivering the third Sumitra Chisti memorial lecture on 'Death on the Farm: The Agrarian Crisis and its Consequences'.According to Finance Minister P. Chidambaram, the debt waiver will only be limited to farmers with two hectares of holding which, said Sainath, rules out 52 percent of farmers in Maharashtra's Vidarbha region. Most of the farmers in Vidarbha had an average of six hectares 'as the quality of land was poor'.'Out of the rest 48 percent, only a qua…